Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing

first_img © 2015 Phys.org More information: Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny, Published 22 April 2015. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0069 AbstractConversational turn-taking is an integral part of language development, as it reflects a confluence of social factors that mitigate communication. Humans coordinate the timing of speech based on the behaviour of another speaker, a behaviour that is learned during infancy. While adults in several primate species engage in vocal turn-taking, the degree to which similar learning processes underlie its development in these non-human species or are unique to language is not clear. We recorded the natural vocal interactions of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) occurring with both their sibling twins and parents over the first year of life and observed at least two parallels with language development. First, marmoset turn-taking is a learned vocal behaviour. Second, marmoset parents potentially played a direct role in guiding the development of turn-taking by providing feedback to their offspring when errors occurred during vocal interactions similarly to what has been observed in humans. Though species-differences are also evident, these findings suggest that similar learning mechanisms may be implemented in the ontogeny of vocal turn-taking across our Order, a finding that has important implications for our understanding of language evolution. Explore further Citation: Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing (2015, April 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-marmosets-vocalizing.html In the primate world, only humans are able to listen to a sound made by someone else and mimic it, a skill that has led to communication and the different languages spoken around the world. Scientists know that part of communicating involves one person listening to what another says, before responding. This requires an ability to understand what it means to take turns when vocalizing. In this new study, the researchers have found that a young marmoset (a small silvery coated South American monkey) was also able to learn to take turns as part of vocalizing.In their study, the researchers studied the vocalizations of a pair of captive marmoset twins (and their parents) over the first year of their life and report that they observed two parallels to language development. The first was that taking turns when vocalizing was a learned behavior. The second was that the young marmosets were essentially taught to take turns vocalizing by their parents in ways that are similar to the methods human parents use to teach children to wait for another person to finish speaking before they try to speak themselves.In watching the monkeys as they grew, the researchers noted that if a youngster made a vocalization while a parent was vocalizing, that vocalization was typically ignored by the adult, which resulted over time in the youngster learning to wait for the adult to finish before vocalizing. They noted that as time passed, the young monkeys became less likely to interrupt—though it was more pronounced with their mother than with their father.The researchers suggest their findings indicate a learning mechanism that is similar across all primates which could lead to a better understanding of the development of language in humans. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of California has found that marmosets learn to wait for others to stop making noise before they vocalize, at a very young age. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Cecilia Chow, Jude Mitchell and Cory Miller describe a study they undertook with young marmoset twins and their parents and what they learned by doing so.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society Common marmoset. (Callithrix jacchus) Credit: Carmem A. Busko/Wikipedia/CC BY 2.5 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Marmoset monkeys know polite conversationlast_img read more

State govt pays tribute to the rebel poet

first_imgKolkata: The state government offered a befitting tribute to poet Kazi Nazrul Islam on his 120th birth anniversary, through a programme at Nazrul Tirtha in New Town.The programme, organised by the state Information and Cultural Affairs department, coincided with the completion of five years of Nazrul Tirtha that was inaugurated by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on this day in 2014. State Urban Development and Municipal Affairs minister Firhad Hakim, minister of state for Information and Cultural Affairs Indranil Sen and poet Joy Goswami attended the programme to commemorate the poet’s birth anniversary. Eminent personalities in different fields were handed over prizes during the occasion. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”Rabindranath Tagore and Kazi Nazrul Islam will always remain in our heart. It is because of them that we boast of our rich culture. We should not forget that it was Nazrul Islam who preached the message of unity among the Hindus and the Muslims through his poem (Mora Eki Brinte Duti Kusum Hindu Musalman),” Hakim said in his address. Earlier in the day, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had tweeted, paying her tribute to the poet. Nazrul Tirtha (Nazrul Pilgrimage) is a cultural and educational centre dedicated to the rebel poet. The centre is situated at Action Area 1, New Town. The design and architecture of the centre is said to be unique in Kolkata and bears the signature material of controversial Swiss-born French architect Le Corbusier. The architectural language has been developed to express the personality of Kazi Nazrul Islam, designed by architect Abin Chaudhuri. At present, the cultural centre is functioning partly as a cinema hall and partly as an open air theatre for exhibitions and live performances.last_img read more