Handvaerk Luxury Basics

first_imgWhen you put an investment banker and an art curator together, you are bound to get a well executed and well designed luxury brand.So is the story with handvaerk (yes it is meant to be lower case you heathen!). In Danish the term means ‘Hand Crafted’, and all of the products in this new, well received line are produced in family-owned and operated workshops in Peru.Partners Esteban Saba (from Lima, Peru) and Petra Brischnacova (from Prague, Czech Republic) were very focused on creating a thoughtfully curated, timeless wardrobe for both sexes with a well edited selection of garments including a sweatshirt, henley, t-shirts, intimates and scarves. Esteban’s grandfather’s company imported luxury fabrics from England and Italy to South America and his mother owned a well-known knitwear company in California for three decades. Needless to say, Saba knows what he is doing.The duo sources the finest Pima cotton from the northern coastal valleys of Peru to Scotland for the best Mongolian cashmere and superfine merino wool. More than a statement of their devotion to the highest standards of craftsmanship and quality, handveark aims to update the definition of “luxury” with thoughtful design, premium materials, and with how each product is made. Speaking of premium materials, take the piqué polo for instance, they hand harvest their cotton to preserve fiber length and pureness, maintaining its unmatched softness and natural luster. Hand harvest!Why the Danish name on the brand? Simple – the couple is obsessed with midcentury modern Danish furniture.Since it is the season of giving, handvaerk is giving away one wool scarf to a lucky reader of The Manual. Check our FaceBook page for more details!The retail price for handvaerk men’s collection ranges from $45 (intimates) up to $475 (cashmere scarf) and is exclusively available at www.handveark.com. What to Wear on a Red-Eye Flight: Fashionably Comfortable Apparel for the Long Haul 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know Are Fermented Pizzas a Trend to Watch? We Asked a Pro to Find Out The Ultimate Pillow Guide: The 6 Best Pillows for All Sleepers 9 Best Spirits For Spiked Apple Cider Editors’ Recommendations last_img read more

More than 90 per cent of children reaching Italys shores are separated

“These figures indicate an alarming trend of an increasing number of highly vulnerable children risking their lives to get to Europe,” said Lucio Melandri, the Senior Emergency Manager at UNICEF. “Current systems in place are failing to protect [them as they] find themselves alone in a [completely] unfamiliar environment,” he added, calling for a coordinated European response, given that the children are on the move. “Apart from addressing the factors that are forcing children to travel alone, a comprehensive protection, monitoring system needs to be developed to protect them,” he stressed. In 2016, some 25,800 unaccompanied or separated children arrived in the European country – compared to the 12,360 who arrived in 2015. These children, arriving by themselves, also accounted for a staggering 91 per cent of all the 28,200 children who reached Italy’s shores last year as refugees or migrants. A majority among of such arrivals were from Eritrea, Egypt, Gambia and Nigeria. Adding to the complex challenges, the Central Mediterranean route from North Africa to Italy also has an incredibly high ratio of unaccompanied and separated children among the refugees and migrants. Compared to other routes, only 17 per cent of the child refugees and migrants who arrived to Greece by sea in 2016, came without adult family members or guardians. “The presence of so many unaccompanied or separated children along the central Mediterranean route is unprecedented,” said Mr. Melandri. “It is obviously clear that we have a serious and growing problem on our hands.” Girls most at riskAccording to UNICEF, though most of the children were boys aged 15-17 years, younger children and girls were also among the arrivals. Girls are at a particular risk of sexual exploitation and abuse, including commercial sexual exploitation by criminal gangs. It further stated that several of the girls who were interviewed by its staff earlier this year in Palermo, the capital of the Italian island of Sicily, reported that they were forced into prostitution in Libya as a means to ‘pay off’ the cost of the boat travel across the Mediterranean. Most of the boys spoke of being forced into manual labour. In addition to protecting child refugees and migrants – particularly unaccompanied children – from exploitation and violence, UNICEF urged stopping the detention of refugee or migrant children; keeping families together; providing quality, learning, healthcare and other related services to all refugee and migrant children; addressing underlying causes of large-scale movements; and combatting xenophobia, discrimination and marginalization. read more