Beaches Resort Recruits Over One Hundred Summer Interns

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, July 13, 2017 – Providenciales – Over 100 enthusiastic students have been selected to join  the  Beaches Turks and Caicos Resorts Villages and Spa  summer intern program which is a part of the company’s work study program aimed at providing students with work experience in the hospitality industry.The new interns were selected following a rigorous recruitment exercise and have since been placed in various departments within the company working in Public Relations, Cost Control, Environmental Health Services and Concierge just to name a few.The initiative is part of the company’s long standing commitment to assisting in the growth and development of the youth of the Turks and Caicos Islands providing practical experience to those who wish to venture into hospitality and related fields.Interns range from high school graduates to college students and include first time interns and returnees.Deleria Simms, assistant human Resources manager for Beaches TCI said the program has been very successful over the years. “We recruited a total of 106 interns.  Our goal is to introduce the students to the hospitality industry with the hope of developing a labor pool from which we can pull on in the future and we focus on developing skills as well as actual learning as opposed to just providing them with a summer job. Even our application process is designed to assess their interview writing skills and to develop their interviewing skills.” Simms said the interns were informed on best practices, hospitality standards and conduct during their training.Guerta Toussaint who is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Supply Chain Management at Broward College in Florida said she was excited to be returning home to gain experience in her field of study. “I am looking to gain experience in the field. I did want to spend the summer doing something constructive that would give me field experience. I’m excited to be able to foster experience in supply chain management. I’m excited to learn more about my field by actually doing it.”Tajh Missick a second year Computer Studies student at the Turks and Caicos Islands Community College was also elated about the program, stating; “I don’t really think of it as a job, I look at it as a learning experience because you learn a lot by interacting with the guest and the employees.”The Internship program is facilitated in part by the Human Resources Department and the Training Department of the Resort. Successful applicants have the option of returning during holidays to intern with the company and are given special consideration for full time employment in the future. Monique Graham- Training Manager at BTC remarked, “Internship is always good because what it does is it helps team members understand what the working world is like so they are better able to transition from high school into the real job and it also helps them to have some savings to help their parents for back to school. For persons who have a greater career expectation, it gives them a true exposure of what the hospitality industry is like so they know if this is what they want to do for the future or this is not what they want to do.”Press Release: Sandals Resort Related Items:last_img read more

Conferees Omit Provision Establishing Navy Jet Noise Reduction Program

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Conferees hashing out the final version of the fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill opted to leave out language calling for the Navy to study ways to reduce the impact of jet noise on host communities and, instead, urged DOD to fully resource existing efforts to address aircraft noise. “The conferees are aware of ongoing jet noise reduction programs by the Department of Defense and believe that reducing noise levels from aviation and other aircraft in communities near military installations should continue to be a priority for the DOD,” according to the joint explanatory statement accompanying the bill’s conference report.The provision in the House version, section 220F, would have authorized the Office of Naval Research to carry out a jet noise reduction program to:identify material and non-material solutions;develop and apply solutions to the Navy fleet;communicate its findings to the civil aviation community; andsupport the development of noise models, prediction tools, noise control strategies and diagnostic tools.But rather than adding a new statute, the conferees said in the explanatory statement they support the Navy’s current noise reduction program: “The conferees understand the Navy will continue this program to guide the design of future noise-control systems for naval aviation systems to reduce the impact on communities adjacent to military facilities and the environment, like those in Washington, California and Florida.” They also noted that the legislation authorizes an additional $2 million for jet noise reduction efforts.Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Samantha Mathisonlast_img read more

Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing

first_img © 2015 Phys.org More information: Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny, Published 22 April 2015. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0069 AbstractConversational turn-taking is an integral part of language development, as it reflects a confluence of social factors that mitigate communication. Humans coordinate the timing of speech based on the behaviour of another speaker, a behaviour that is learned during infancy. While adults in several primate species engage in vocal turn-taking, the degree to which similar learning processes underlie its development in these non-human species or are unique to language is not clear. We recorded the natural vocal interactions of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) occurring with both their sibling twins and parents over the first year of life and observed at least two parallels with language development. First, marmoset turn-taking is a learned vocal behaviour. Second, marmoset parents potentially played a direct role in guiding the development of turn-taking by providing feedback to their offspring when errors occurred during vocal interactions similarly to what has been observed in humans. Though species-differences are also evident, these findings suggest that similar learning mechanisms may be implemented in the ontogeny of vocal turn-taking across our Order, a finding that has important implications for our understanding of language evolution. Explore further Citation: Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing (2015, April 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-marmosets-vocalizing.html In the primate world, only humans are able to listen to a sound made by someone else and mimic it, a skill that has led to communication and the different languages spoken around the world. Scientists know that part of communicating involves one person listening to what another says, before responding. This requires an ability to understand what it means to take turns when vocalizing. In this new study, the researchers have found that a young marmoset (a small silvery coated South American monkey) was also able to learn to take turns as part of vocalizing.In their study, the researchers studied the vocalizations of a pair of captive marmoset twins (and their parents) over the first year of their life and report that they observed two parallels to language development. The first was that taking turns when vocalizing was a learned behavior. The second was that the young marmosets were essentially taught to take turns vocalizing by their parents in ways that are similar to the methods human parents use to teach children to wait for another person to finish speaking before they try to speak themselves.In watching the monkeys as they grew, the researchers noted that if a youngster made a vocalization while a parent was vocalizing, that vocalization was typically ignored by the adult, which resulted over time in the youngster learning to wait for the adult to finish before vocalizing. They noted that as time passed, the young monkeys became less likely to interrupt—though it was more pronounced with their mother than with their father.The researchers suggest their findings indicate a learning mechanism that is similar across all primates which could lead to a better understanding of the development of language in humans. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of California has found that marmosets learn to wait for others to stop making noise before they vocalize, at a very young age. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Cecilia Chow, Jude Mitchell and Cory Miller describe a study they undertook with young marmoset twins and their parents and what they learned by doing so.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society Common marmoset. (Callithrix jacchus) Credit: Carmem A. Busko/Wikipedia/CC BY 2.5 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Marmoset monkeys know polite conversationlast_img read more