Education Minister Commends NCEL

first_img “I must extend my heartiest congratulations to all of you graduates who have endured the rigours of this important programme. You have been well trained and prepared for the task that is ahead of us. You have now empowered yourselves to take on leadership roles,” he said. Education, Youth and Information Minister, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, is lauding the National College for Educational Leadership (NCEL) for outstanding work in preparing educators to be effective leaders, through its Aspiring Principals Programme.At a graduation ceremony on June 28, some 96 participants successfully matriculated from the programme. The ceremony was held at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona Campus in Kingston.Senator Reid also commended the participants for taking this step in their careers.“I must extend my heartiest congratulations to all of you graduates who have endured the rigours of this important programme. You have been well trained and prepared for the task that is ahead of us. You have now empowered yourselves to take on leadership roles,” he said.He charged the participants to go forward with the newly acquired knowledge and skills, and to be transformational leaders.“Wherever you serve and wherever you go, you are the finest principals in Jamaica and the world,” the Minister said.For his part, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dean-Roy Bernard, also commended the graduates.“With the changing dynamics, new paradigms and demands on the education system, teachers, and especially those that aspire to leadership, are better served when they commit themselves to a process of professional development and lifelong learning,” he said.“Experience has shown also that while many of our teachers are prepared for classroom instruction delivery, and in some cases to take on additional administrative duties, the overall responsibilities of management often prove to be demanding. I am confident that in this professional development programme, you have acquired an appreciation of the task of school leadership and management, along with the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead,” the Permanent Secretary said.For her part, Director/Principal of NCEL, Dr. Taneisha Ingleton, said the programme intersects practice and theories with the practical elements. These include personalised action plans, peer learning groups, reflective logs, teaching and creation of educational blogs. Participants also received training in public speaking, academic writing etiquette and decorum.“This exposure helps participants to challenge assumptions, build their understanding and ability to discover for themselves, make connections and create solutions.They, therefore, have these skills to build the same in their colleagues and students,” Dr. Ingleton explained.Established under the Education System Transformation Programme (ESTP), the NCEL seeks to develop excellence in leadership as a common denominator in schools and support institutions.The nine-month modular Aspiring Principals Programme aims to identify and prepare future school leaders. It is delivered through the UWI at both its Mona andWestern Jamaica campuses on a part time basis by way of face-to-face instruction, distance learning, coaching and mentorship.The programme provides a standard credential, the Professional Qualification for Principalship (PQP) to which the Ministry of Education and school Boards will refer before authorising the hiring of principals of public schools.The programme is designed to enhance key leadership competencies, such as financial acuity, community leadership, organisational leadership, transformational leadership, instructional leadership, strategic thinking, leading change, communication, collegial engagement, teamwork and fellowship, ethics and integrity, self awareness and technological skills. At a graduation ceremony on June 28, some 96 participants successfully matriculated from the programme. The ceremony was held at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona Campus in Kingston. Education, Youth and Information Minister, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, is lauding the National College for Educational Leadership (NCEL) for outstanding work in preparing educators to be effective leaders, through its Aspiring Principals Programme. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Youth Urged to Beware of Potential Dangers on Social Media

first_img Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, is urging young people, especially girls, to beware of potential dangers they can be exposed to on social media. Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, is urging young people, especially girls, to beware of potential dangers they can be exposed to on social media.“Recognise that a lot of what is happening out there is falsehood… [and can lead to you to getting] in with the wrong crowd,” she cautioned, citing human trafficking as an example.She was speaking at a Social Change Luncheon hosted under the ‘We Inspire Girls to be Strong Women’ initiative at the Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston on May 2.Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison (centre), converses with students attending a Social Change Luncheon hosted under the ‘We Inspire Girls to be Strong Women’ initiative at the Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston on May 2. From second left are: Eddie-Ann Gordon of Vere Technical High School; Janeil Stephens – St. Catherine High; Markiesh Francis – Westwood High; Roshelle Pinnock – B.B. Coke High School; and Kerrisha Francis – Dinthill High. Looking on (at left) is the initiative’s conceptualiser, Cortia Bingham. “Recognise that a lot of what is happening out there is falsehood… [and can lead to you to getting] in with the wrong crowd,” she cautioned, citing human trafficking as an example. Story Highlights She was speaking at a Social Change Luncheon hosted under the ‘We Inspire Girls to be Strong Women’ initiative at the Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston on May 2. Mrs. Gordon Harrison said a recent assessment of the typical human trafficking victim in Jamaica points to girls, aged 13 to 17, with serious self-esteem issues.She said they tend to “listen to anybody and do anything to get some attention, and buy into the garbage that human traffickers are feeding that target population”.This, the Children’s Advocate further stated, sets them up as prime prey for the perpetrators of this heinous crime.She, therefore, encouraged young people to stay focused and not be distracted by the social media “hype”.Conceptualiser of the ‘We Inspire Girls to be Strong Women’ initiative, Cortia Bingham (centre), with Vere Technical High School student, Eddie-Ann Gordon (left), and Guidance Counsellor at the institution, Owen Rodney. The occasion was a Social Change Luncheon hosted under the initiative at the Courtleigh Hotel in New Kingston on May 2. During the event, girls from five high schools made presentations on social change initiatives they developed, which were assessed by a panel of judges. Miss Gordon, who presented on cyber bullying, emerged the winner and received several prizes including a scholarship valued $50,000. Mrs. Gordon Harrison also cautioned them to be careful how they present themselves on social media, noting that Human Resource interests scout the platform to view the profiles of prospective employees.In the meantime, the Children’s Advocate is encouraging girls to trust their instincts if they feel uncomfortable with certain situations, particularly instances of abuse.“Abuse is real! It can derail your life in a very real and significant way and you need to learn to trust your instincts. It doesn’t matter who it is; if it feels wrong, chances are it is wrong. The abuser, typically, is somebody who knows you very well and who you trust and who is close to you… so listen to those instincts,” she said.Additionally, Mrs. Gordon Harrison encouraged young girls to aspire to become leaders and agents of change as, ultimately, “you will be the movers and shakers of tomorrow”.Conceptualizer of the initiative, Cortia Bingham, said the movement seeks to influence the next generation of women to become innovators and creative, critical thinkers who can influence positive changes in the society.“One of the main things that we wanted to achieve with We Inspire Girls to be Strong Women, is to create more women who are thought leaders who [can] bring bright ideas that can really push Jamaica forward,” she said.During the luncheon, girls from five high schools presented their social change initiatives which they believe will positively impact their communities or schools. These were assessed by a panel of judges.Eddie-Ann Gordon, a Grade 10 student from Vere Technical High School, emerged the winner with her initiative focusing on reducing cyber bullying.She was awarded a $50,000 scholarship by Foska Oats; one-year mentorship; lunch vouchers for one school term and furniture from Courts Jamaica; a paid internship from Chas E Ramson, and sponsors’ products valued $100,000.Second-place went to Roshelle Pinnock of B.B. Coke High, whose initiative focused on proper dining etiquette.Markiesh Francis of Westwood High; Kerrisha Francis of Dinthill High; and Janeil Stephens of St. Catherine High also made impactful presentations.Since 2017, the We Inspire team, through a high school tour, has been to more than 50 secondary schools islandwide, directly engaging more than 10,000 girls to think critically, dream big and create a life based on principles and values.last_img read more