CANDY CORN COUNT WINNER (Midtown)

first_imgCANDY CORN COUNT WINNER — Sophia Napolitano, a student in Mrs. Czuba’s third grade at Midtown Community School, guessed that there were 230 in the jar, the actual number was 236! Way to go Sophia! ×last_img

Clashes outside White House as US cities under curfew

first_imgPolice fired tear gas outside the White House late Sunday as anti-racism protestors again took to the streets to voice fury at police brutality, and major US cities were put under curfew to suppress rioting.With the Trump administration branding instigators of six nights of rioting as domestic terrorists, there were more confrontations between protestors and police and fresh outbreaks of looting.Violent clashes erupted repeatedly in a small park next to the White House, with authorities using tear gas, pepper spray and flash bang grenades to disperse crowds who lit several large fires and damaged property. At one point, some of the protestors who had reached a bridge were forced to scramble for cover when a truck drove at speed after having apparently breached a barricade.The driver was taken to hospital after the protestors hauled him from the vehicle, although there were no immediate reports of other casualties.The New York Times said he was later arrested.There were other large-scale protests in cities including New York and Miami.Washington’s mayor ordered a curfew from 11:00 pm until 6:00 am, as a report in the New York Times said that President Donald Trump had been rushed by Secret Service agents into an underground bunker at the White House on Friday night during an earlier protest.Gucci, Rolex stores ransacked Looting was reported Sunday night in Philadelphia and the Los Angeles suburb of Santa Monica, and images on Fox TV showed ransacked Rolex and Gucci stores in New York city.Officials in LA — a city scarred by the 1992 riots over the police beating of Rodney King, an African-American man — imposed a curfew from 4:00 pm Sunday until dawn.”Please, use your discretion and go early, go home, stay home,” the city’s mayor Eric Garcetti said on CNN.The shocking death last Monday of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, at the hands of police in Minneapolis ignited the nationwide wave of outrage over law enforcement’s repeated use of lethal force against unarmed African Americans.Floyd stopped breathing after Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes.Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and is due to make his first appearance in court on Monday. Late Sunday, as many were being arrested for curfew violations in Minneapolis, authorities moved Chauvin to another location from the Hennepin County Jail for his own safety, according to Minnesota’s corrections commissioner.Three other officers with him at the arrest have been fired but for now face no charges.Governor Tim Walz has mobilized all of Minnesota’s National Guard troops  — the state guard’s biggest mobilization ever — to help restore order and extended a curfew for a third night Sunday.The Department of Defense said that around 5,000 National Guard troops had been mobilized in 15 states as well as the capital Washington, with another 2,000 on standby.The widespread resort to uniformed National Guards units is rare, and evoked disturbing memories of the rioting in US cities in 1967 and 1968 in a turbulent time of protest over racial and economic disparities. Trump blamed the extreme left for the violence, saying he planned to designate a group known as Antifa as a terrorist organization.’A nation in pain’ Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said Trump, who has often urged police to use tough tactics, was not helping matters.”We are beyond a tipping point in this country, and his rhetoric only enflames that,” she said on CBS.Joe Biden, Trump’s likely Democratic opponent in November’s presidential election, visited the scene of one anti-racism protest.”We are a nation in pain right now, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us,” Biden tweeted, posting a picture of him speaking with an African-American family at the site where protesters had gathered in Delaware late Saturday.Floyd’s death has triggered protests beyond the United States, with thousands in Montreal and London marching in solidarity on Sunday.On the other side of the globe on Monday, thousands marched to the US consulate in Auckland chanting “no justice, no peace” and “black lives matter.”In Germany, England football international Jadon Sancho marked one of his three goals for Borussia Dortmund against Paderborn by lifting his jersey to reveal a T-shirt bearing the words “Justice for George Floyd.”Topics : Local US leaders appealed to citizens to give constructive outlet to their rage over the death of an unarmed black man in Minneapolis, while night-time curfews were imposed in cities including Washington, Los Angeles and Houston.One closely watched protest was outside the state capitol in Minneapolis’ twin city of St. Paul, where several thousand people gathered before marching down a highway.”We have black sons, black brothers, black friends, we don’t want them to die. We are tired of this happening, this generation is not having it, we are tired of oppression,” said Muna Abdi, a 31-year-old black woman who joined the protest.Hundreds of police and National Guard troops were deployed ahead of the protest.last_img read more

Switzerland’s largest public pension fund divests from coal

first_imgPublica, Switzerland’s largest public pension fund, has divested its equity holdings in coal companies because of the financial risks posed by their vulnerability to public policy measures to combat climate change.The €34bn pension fund is a “Sammelstiftung”, an independent collective institution that manages the assets of 20 Swiss public pension schemes, seven of which are closed to new entrants.Stefan Beiner, head of asset management at Publica, told IPE the pension fund has sold the totality of its equity stakes in coal companies, worth around CHF10m (€9.2m) at the time, on the back of a decision taken early this year in the context of its annual risk-management review process.“Once a year, we look at risks that are difficult to quantify, which tend to be ESG risks, and last year we prioritised climate change,” he said. The next step was for the pension fund to investigate this risk in three sectors – coal, gas and oil.It did this first by assessing the likelihood of operating conditions changing in the form of a carbon tax, and in a second step by analysing the extent to which the companies in a given sector could adapt.It concluded that, sooner or later, there will be a carbon tax, or any such tax already in effect will be increased.“We don’t know when or by how much, but the probability is high that there will be one,” said Beiner.It decided that oil and gas companies were “relatively broadly diversified and capable of adapting” but that this was not the case in the coal sector.“The companies tend to be very focused, namely on coal extraction, and our view is that they will struggle if carbon taxes are increased,” said Beiner.In a final step, the pension fund considered whether coal companies’ carbon risk was adequately priced in, and decided it was not.“When it comes to coal companies, we don’t think the financial risks are compensated,” said Beiner. “The risks for oil and gas companies are manageable.”A coal company, for the purposes of Publica’s exclusion policy, is defined as such based on the classification applied by MSCI for its GICS coal and consumable fuels sub-industry index.Some 10 companies, mainly from emerging markets, were affected by Publica’s policy.Asked about the roll-out of the policy to other asset classes, Beiner noted that the universe of effected companies was very small and that Publica did not own any bonds issued by them, so the question did not arise.The exclusion of coal is hard-wired into Publica’s compliance system, he added, meaning that the entry into its universe of any company meeting the exclusion criterion is immediately flagged.   For the time being, the decision to exclude investments in coal is borne as an active risk by Publica, although, in the medium term, the pension fund intends to adjust its customised benchmark to reflect its new policy on coal.Publica is thought to be the first major Swiss pension fund to divest on climate change-related grounds, although local government schemes are coming under pressure to do so, too.The municipal council of Carouge, a town in the canton of Geneva, for example, has recently unanimously voted in favour of divesting from fossil fuels, according to Swiss news service Le Courrier. The motion was put forward by Green party officials, emulating a move made by their counterparts at the city and canton of Geneva, according to the media report.last_img read more

Sato wins 2nd Indianapolis 500 under caution at empty track

first_img Takuma Sato snatched a second Indianapolis 500 victory at empty Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday as the Japanese racer held off Scott Dixon and ultimately won under caution.Sato held off Scott Dixon after teammate Spencer Pigot crashed with five laps remaining in Sunday’s race, held in front of empty grandstands for the first time in 104 runnings because of the pandemic.Pigot needed medical attention on the track, the crash scene was a massive debris field and the cleanup time would have been lengthy.There were also just four laps left in the race, not enough time to allow for a proper restart.(Image Credit: AP)  Associated Press Television News WATCH US LIVE LIVE TV FOLLOW US First Published: 24th August, 2020 10:49 ISTcenter_img Last Updated: 24th August, 2020 10:49 IST Sato Wins 2nd Indianapolis 500 Under Caution At Empty Track Pigot needed medical attention on the track, the crash scene was a massive debris field and the cleanup time would have been lengthy.There were also just four laps left in the race, not enough time to allow for a proper restart. Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENTlast_img read more