Downtown Evansville  Economic Improvement District Priorities for 2020

first_imgTheir efforts are managed by a Board of Directors made up of multiple assessed property owners, Downtown businesses and non-profits, and Downtown residents. We created the fifth such district in Indiana, and there are over 1,000 similar districts across the US.First funded in 2018, our efforts have included alley activation and beautification, litter cleanup, landscape enhancements, developer and business recruitment, investor development for Downtown projects, holiday décor, banners, support for large community-wide events, advertising, relaunching the farmers market, producing 20 DowntownEvansville events annually, providing additional patrols by off-duty police officers, supporting efforts to increase the hours of services available at the United Caring Services homeless shelter, and supporting the City through maintaining amenities such as painting the arch or repairing electrical outlets on Riverside Drive. Downtown Evansville  Economic Improvement District Priorities for 2020The Downtown Evansville Economic Improvement District uses a special assessment on Downtown properties to provide services beyond those the City provides to these assessed properties. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare,Their efforts are managed by a Board of Directors made up of multiple assessed property owners, Downtown businesses and non-profits, and Downtown residents. We created the fifth such district in Indiana, and there are over 1,000 similar districts across the US.First funded in 2018, our efforts have included alley activation and beautification, litter cleanup, landscape enhancements, developer and business recruitment, investor development for Downtown projects, holiday décor, banners, support for large community-wide events, advertising, relaunching the farmers market, producing 20 DowntownEvansville events annually, providing additional patrols by off-duty police officers, supporting efforts to increase the hours of services available at the United Caring Services homeless shelter, and supporting the City through maintaining amenities such as painting the arch or repairing electrical outlets on Riverside Drive.center_img They are seeking the input of our property owners and the broader community regarding our efforts in 2020. During this short survey, you can share how you feel our resources should be applied. This survey, with feedback from our board and the guidance of the Master Plan, will focus our 2020 goals and work plan. Our work generally occurs in an area bound by the Ohio River, Fulton, Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. and Walnut. Properties on Main Street are assessed at a higher level for the increased amount of benefit provided.If you’d like more information, visit their website at www.DowntownEvansville.com or follow us on all social media platforms as “Downtown Evansville Indiana.” They are seeking the input of our property owners and the broader community regarding our efforts in 2020. During this short survey, you can share how you feel our resources should be applied. This survey, with feedback from our board and the guidance of the Master Plan, will focus our 2020 goals and work plan. Our work generally occurs in an area bound by the Ohio River, Fulton, Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. and Walnut. Properties on Main Street are assessed at a higher level for the increased amount of benefit provided.If you’d like more information, visit their website at www.DowntownEvansville.com or follow us on all social media platforms as “Downtown Evansville Indiana.”last_img read more

Campus musicians find outlets for talent

first_imgNotre Dame has provided Nick Gunty with special opportunities to display his musical talent, the junior, who plays the guitar, said. “Every once in a while something comes around, like the Sudan peace rally last Saturday,” Gunty said. “I got to play for that. That was probably the most special or most ‘Notre Dame’ thing I’ve done.” Junior Will Thwaites said the University has also allowed for unique performance opportunities for his musical group, A Face For Radio. The group consists of Thwaites, juniors Kyle Collins, Michael George and Collin Chudwick and sophomores Danny Cruser and John Mandrakas. “We opened for White Panda when they were in town, which went really well. It was really fun to get up there before a really big act,” he said. “They had about 500 kids in the audience, not all of them super psyched for our music but it was definitely cool to have a crowd that big.” Thwaites said he is lucky to have found other music students who enjoy playing and performing in their free time. “The biggest thing here is there is a lot of untapped talent. There’s a ton of kids who were really talented musicians in high school that really don’t have the opportunity to pursue music here because they’re dominated by their education,” he said. “A lot of the musical initiatives on campus are very formal.” Gunty, who describes his music style as indie folk rock, said he has worked hard to not only play live on campus, but in local establishments. He also said he is looking to expand where he performs. “Fiddler’s Hearth [in South Bend] has an open mic every week. That gives you a lot of frequency,” Gunty said. “Lately I’ve been reaching out to places a little more extended like Indianapolis, Three Oaks in Michigan and Chicago.” Thwaites said his musical endeavors are more of a hobby. “It’s definitely not my number one pursuit,” he said. “I’m working hard at school, and this is something I do on the side.” Thwaites said he sometimes struggles to strike a balance between academics and music. But he said musical success brings him greater joy. “Since I have been doing this, I’ve been trying to find this dynamic between the two because every time I get my school work down, my music suffers and every time I get into a flow musically, my grades turn into C’s,” Thwaites said. “The thing I come back to is every time I finish a good music thing, I’m on cloud nine and every time I do well in school, it doesn’t feel any different than before.” Though he considers his music a full-time pursuit, Gunty said his classes have made it difficult to commit to his music. “It definitely is a full time thing. Particularly sophomore year, I spent a lot of time — probably half and half — between music and school,” he said. “It’s easy to do that freshman and sophomore year when you don’t have a lot of work to do.” Gunty said he plans to pursue a career in music. “To really figure out if you can make it, you have to live in a place that really lives it,” he said. “I definitely have a plan to move to Chicago or maybe Los Angeles after school to give it a full-time try.” Thwaites said he sees his music as more of an outlet for his creativity than any sort of potential vocation, but he said he would give a musical career a try if the opportunity presented itself. “It’s definitely not my number one goal in doing it,” he said. “I do it just for the fun of it. I do it because it’s a nice way to express myself creatively.” Thwaites said he focused mainly on rap freshman and sophomore year. His YouTube video, “Daisy’s Lullaby (The Great Gatsby Rap)” has over 97,000 views. Thwaites said the success of his song has spilled over into classrooms across the country. “I’ve had a lot of different English teachers get in touch with me. One in particular who works at a Title One school where a lot of her kids haven’t read books before,” he said. “She reached out to me to help her plan to get these juniors in high school to finish their first book, being ‘The Great Gatsby.’” Gunty, who already has an album available on iTunes, said he doesn’t plan on halting his musical pursuits as he studies abroad in the spring in Toledo, Spain. “By the end of next semester, I want to have another short one recorded, like a five song EP,” he said. Thwaites said despite a busy fall semester, A Face For Radio is looking to release new material in the near future. He said he has always been active in singing in local choirs from a young age, but an assignment for his senior English class where he sang about his classroom experiences sparked his interest as a live artist. “It was the first time I had gotten on stage in front of a group of people,” he said. “Once I got a taste of it I didn’t want to turn back.”last_img read more

Whicker: Free agency proves the NBA is a league for all seasons

first_imgIt shows how the NBA virtually dominates our entire calendar.It is also one of the great legacies of LeBron James.As we await the leakage of the white smoke that will tell us where Kawhi Leonard, Kyrie Irving, Kemba Walker and Kevin Durant are playing next year, we are reminded of the way Durant lured the Warriors to the Hamptons three summers ago and signed what would become two championship banners.We remember how James tantalized us with The Homecoming to Cleveland in 2014, and how he interrupted our Sunday cookouts when he committed to the Lakers. (He never called it a Homestaying.)For that matter, you heard the huzzahs from every beach a few days earlier, when the Lakers got Steve Nash. In real terms this began in 2010, when James put Clevelanders through an emotional car wash and announced, at the end of a tawdry 30-minute ESPN special, that he was taking his talents to South Beach. The subsequent burning of No. 23 jerseys was the most famous Cleveland fire since the Cuyahoga River.Sure, stars had left before, like Shaquille O’Neal left Orlando for L.A. in 1996. But the Larry Bird free agency clause, allowing teams to exceed the salary cap to keep their own players, usually held sway.It promoted stability. Bird, Magic Johnson, Isiah Thomas and Michael Jordan are associated with one uniform (no throwbacks or alternate jerseys, either).There were trades. The 76ers gave up Caldwell Jones and a first-rounder to get Moses Malone and, ergo, a title in 1983. The Celtics picked up Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen in trades that cost them Theo Ratliff, Al Jefferson, Sebastian Telfair, Gerald Green, Ryan Gomes, Wally Szczerbiak, Delonte West and three first-round draft choices. This left them with a skeleton crew that Danny Ainge artfully fattened with James Posey, Glen Davis, Kendrick Perkins and Tony Allen. The Celtics pulverized the Lakers in the 2008 Finals.But James was the NBA’s first real Lone Arranger, the one who became director, producer and casting director.None of these free agents will have James’ influence, but they will be the primary determinants of the 2019-20 season.As it turned out, the Toronto-San Antonio trade was the defining moment of last summer. Leonard and Danny Green became Raptors, DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl became Spurs. The risk was that the rehabbing Leonard would play a sabbatical season and then sign elsewhere. Instead, he and Toronto won a championship and now there’s every reason for Leonard to stay.This, of course, is a delicious time for a league that once begged for attention in January. And remember when Jordan was going to retire and take all the NBA’s eyeballs with him?Years ago, the NBA generally had one game on Christmas Day, matching teams that moaned about sacrificing the holiday. Now there are five Christmas games, all status symbols. Imagine Christmas 2019 and a menu of Lakers-New Orleans, Toronto-Philadelphia, Houston-Golden State, Clippers-Milwaukee and Denver-Portland. Or make up your own lineup.Then the NBA takes us to the All-Star Game and the trade deadline and the playoffs. Shortly after that comes the sensory overload that has become the draft, with a televised combine as the lead-in.Then come the NBA Awards, on a Monday night with a red carpet and the whole league on hand. Remember when they used to parcel out those awards at halftime during the playoffs, and when Dirk Nowitzki glumly accepted his MVP long after the top-seeded Mavericks were eliminated? This is much better.Then comes free agency, followed by the bewildering success of the NBA Summer League.It is quite a takeover, fueled by a procession of identifiable stars and a sudden sense of unpredictability. Wasn’t Boston supposed to win the East? Weren’t the Lakers supposed to make the playoffs? Wasn’t Giannis Antetokounmpo a stretchy No. 10 pick in the first round, and nobody’s idea of an MVP?The league that compensates its players like no other is also the league that encourages their free expression and nurtures their humanity. It captures our consciousness, year-round, because it deserves to.The Decision moved this process. Like most decisions, it had consequences. On Sunday, the 10th official day of summer, we will play volleyball, grill some tri-tips, ride bikes and watch basketball.The season itself might not be endless, but the game is.The Free Agent Shopping Network has become the most consequential day in every NBA season that does not have a Game 7 in the Finals.It is certainly more compelling than anything else going on in sports that day, with sincere apologies to the U.S. Women’s National Team and the various home run/strikeout practitioners around us.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Winter Meetings preview: Dodgers’ surplus in the outfield, starting pitchers could help make deals happen

first_img“We’ve had a number of conversations with teams and agents and have a list of target players at the various spots we’re looking to address and are having fluid conversations on those fronts,” Friedman said with the usual circumspection.The Dodgers’ approach to restocking the bullpen has not included a willingness to spend heavily for established relievers – a reluctance borne out by the poor track record of such signings. This year’s ‘buyers-beware’ stock of free-agent relievers is led by 33-year-old Adam Ottavino (who made $7 million with the Rockies last year), 29-year-old Jeurys Familia and 31-year-old Joe Kelly.“We’ve made offers on guys where we would have spent on guys in the bullpen,” Friedman said of his track record with relievers. “But I think as you look back over time if free-agent reliever deals were really helpful in teams winning more games, winning a World Series then, yes. It just hasn’t necessarily played out that way.“But that doesn’t mean it’s a market we close off. It just makes us a little more selective in who we go after. How things play out, I’m not sure right now.” Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Puig is a recurring star of the trade-rumor circuit both in July and all winter long. But his cost could exceed his trade value now that he has reached arbitration eligibility.A similar logjam among the starting pitchers also makes for valuable trade stock.Nine pitchers made at least two starts for the Dodgers last season. All are under contract (or club control) for 2019. Three could be free agents next winter (Rich Hill, Alex Wood and Hyun-Jin Ryu). Wood, Kenta Maeda and Ross Stripling, in particular, have often been bumped to the bullpen by the overbooking but now might be more valuable as trade chips than as reluctant relievers again next season.That gives Friedman ample options to try and address his team’s acknowledged needs this winter – a catcher to pair with backup Austin Barnes and fresh arms for the annual bullpen rebuild.With Yasmani Grandal virtually certain to sign elsewhere, catching is the Dodgers’ top priority this winter. Four top prospects (led by Will Smith and Keibert Ruiz) are not ready yet, nor has Barnes shown a readiness to carry the load at the position.A move to acquire someone to bridge the gap until Smith or Ruiz is big-league ready is the most likely outcome with Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto the only apparent option offering more. But the Marlins’ asking price for Realmuto is high with a young big-leaguer like Cody Bellinger in their sights as the centerpiece for any acceptable package.One Dodgers target – Yan Gomes – has already been traded and other free-agent catchers (Brian McCann, Robinson Chirinos, Jeff Mathis and Kurt Suzuki) have signed.Related Articles Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies center_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season That doesn’t mean the Dodgers aren’t interested in Harper – they reached out to the Washington Nationals about a possible mid-season trade for the outfielder this past season. But Harper and his agent, Scott Boras, are aiming for Giancarlo Stanton’s record $325 million contract. Even a shorter contract for, say, half of that would represent a major break from the established track record of the Friedman-led front office.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Since Friedman took over four years ago, the Dodgers have spent to keep their own free agents (most expensively extending Clayton Kershaw for $93 million over the next three seasons). They have traded for high-salaried players (Manny Machado most recently). But they have not spent big for free agents – regrettable $48 million deals with Scott Kazmir and Brandon McCarthy remain the high-water mark for Friedman’s free-agent spending with the Dodgers.A big move for Harper now would likely trigger other moves involving the Dodgers’ current surplus of outfielders. That surplus and their deep collection of starting pitchers are the assets the Dodgers are most likely to spend this week and deeper into the offseason.Eight players made at least five starts in the outfield for the Dodgers last season and all are under contract (or club control) for 2019 – Joc Pederson, Matt Kemp, Cody Bellinger, Yasiel Puig, Alex Verdugo, Andrew Toles, Chris Taylor and Kiké Hernandez.Verdugo could be the most valuable and tradeable asset in the group. The 22-year-old has spent the past two seasons largely in Triple-A and is fast approaching the expiration date of his prospect status. LOS ANGELES — Misinformation is not necessarily a bad thing in Andrew Friedman’s world. It can be “a powerful tool,” smoke that obscures his true intentions.’Tis the season then. Rumor and speculation rule the baseball world as the Dodgers and 29 other teams head to Las Vegas for the annual Winter Meetings this week.The game is already on with the Dodgers central in what they insist is misinformation regarding their interest in this winter’s big prize – free agent outfielder Bryce Harper.They dispute reports that a group of Dodgers representatives, including co-owner Magic Johnson, had recently visited Harper in Las Vegas (his hometown). Johnson has made calls to draft picks the Dodgers were hoping to woo into signing but has never been involved with courting free agents personally for the team and he refuted the reports, saying he had met Harper on the field before a game once but had never been to the star’s home. Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco last_img read more