Video of the Day – Denzel Washington doing to Haka

first_imgYou would usually associate American acting legend Denzel Washington with sports like American Football. But when he was on a promotion tour for the film Unstoppable, he stopped by Good Morning America and ran into New Zealand All Blacks Rugby Legends Michael Jones & Frano Botica to name a few. Check out if he’s any good? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

France’s toughest battle with themselves, not the Pumas

first_img Fronting up: Louis Picamoles and his teammates were in inspired form against the Wallabies. Can they do it again?By Gavin MortimerTHE GREATEST challenge facing France on Saturday in Lille isn’t the Pumas – strong as they’ll be  – but the French themselves. “We will see if we’re capable of stringing together two top quality performances,” said coach Philippe Saint-Andre whose only change to the side that beat Australia is the return of Yoann Maestri at lock in place of Jocelino Suta.It’s a challenge that has proved too much for recent French sides. Take the 1999 World Cup, for example, when Les Bleus under Jean-Claude Skrela produced arguably the greatest comeback in Test match rugby, overturning a 14 point deficit against the All Blacks to triumph 43-31. Six days later in the final and the French were off-the-pace, slumping miserably to a 35-12 defeat to Australia.Monsieur motivator: Philippe Saint-AndreThey did were at it again four years later. Hammering Ireland in the quarter-final and then being humbled by England in the semi-final. Ditto 2007 when Bernard Laporte once again watched from afar as his boys stunned the All Blacks in the quarter-final and froze against England a week later.Marc Lievremont wasn’t able to alter the mindset. Remember when France beat the then reigning world champions, South Africa, in Toulouse three years ago? It was the start of a wonderful new era, or so we were told; two weeks later France were stuffed 39-12 by the All Blacks in Paris. And let’s not forget last year’s World Cup when France somehow staggered into the final without ever stringing together two games of top-drawer rugby. Even the most one-eyed Frenchmen will admit – albeit when his tongue has been loosened by a pastis – that France would never have reached the final if Wales hadn’t had Sam Warburton sent off 17 minutes into their semi-final clash.By all accounts, Saint-Andre has spent this week drumming into his players the necessity to maintain the intensity levels shown in the 33-6 win over Australia last week. Asked by French journalists what he thought of No8 Louis Picamoles’ performance against the Wallabies (which had much to commend it), Saint-Andre replied: “I’m not going to garland him with praise because when we do that he has a tendency to go to sleep the next match.” LA PLATA, ARGENTINA – SEPTEMBER 29: Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe, the Argentina captain looks on during the Rugby Championship match between Argentina and the New Zealand All Blacks at Estadio Ciudad de La Plata on September 29, 2012 in La Plata, Argentina. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sarting XV: Brice Dulin; Wesley Fofana, Florian Fritz, Maxime Mermoz, Vincent Clerc; Frederic Michalak, Maxime Machenaud; Louis Picamoles, Fulgence Ouedraogo, Yannick Nyanga; Yoann Maestri, Pascal Pape (capt); Nicolas Mas, Dimitri Szarzewski, Yannick Forestier.Replacements: Benjamin Kayser, Thomas Domingo, Vincent Debaty, Jocelino Suta, Damien Chouly, Morgan Parra, Francois Trinh-Duc Saint-Andre’s philosophy, learned during his time coaching in England with Gloucester and Sale, seems to be working. The buzzword this week in the French camp has been “la constance” – in words continuity and consistency. Picamoles has acknowledged his need to play with it, as has hooker Dimitri Szarzewski, while Frederic Michalak this week warned his teammates that there is still a lot of room for improvement.Leader: Juan-Martin Fernandez LobbeArgentina are a completely different proposition to Australia, their threat lying not in pacy threequarters but hard, confrontational forwards led by the outstanding Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe. Yet for all the strength of the Pumas’ pack, France on paper, should win. But rugby’s not played on paper, it’s played first and foremost in the head, as Saint-Andre knows only too well. “The big challenge is to try not to be French,” he said in announcing the XV to face Argentina, “and to play with the same intensity, the same ferocity on consecutive weeks.”If France can do that, then the rest of the world might realty start to sit up and take notice.last_img read more

Heineken Cup Final: No certainties in all-French affair

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Toulon: D Armitage; Wulf, Bastareaud, Giteau, Palisson; Wilkinson (c), Tillous-Borde; Sheridan, Bruno, Hayman, Botha, Kennedy, Rossouw, Fernandez Lobbe, MasoeSubs: Orioli, Jenkins, Kubriashvili, Van Niekerk, Armitage, Mermoz, Michalak, Suta Honours even: The last time Clermont met Toulon there was a 26-all draw, despite Clermont playing a second-stringBy Alan DymockDUBLIN WILL be a certain shade of yellow or red come Saturday evening after two very familiar French foes do battle in the Heineken Cup final.If Clermont Auvergne’s more outspoken players are to be believed, the drawn game between Clermont and Toulon in April was one that Toulon were lucky to keep a grip on, despite the fact that the Vulcans fielded a second-string.And it was all yellow: Clermont’s ‘enthusiastic’ supportThis may well have been true. However, while the set from Toulon counted Jonny Wilkinson, The Armitages, Mathieu Bastareaud and Bakkies Botha among their ranks, a second XV from Clermont still included world class performers like Elvis Vermeulen, Julien Malzieu, Regan King and Julien Pierre.In that instance, too, it must be made clear that the game was played out between two factions already assured of their place at the very top of the Top 14. This Saturday is a final. Europe’s grandest final. The Heineken Cup is the one everyone bursts themselves to win.Clermont are understandably confident, with their rich pedigree and eight wins from eight in the Heineken. They are hunting down the Cup – something they have never done before – and all comers have been nonchalantly swatted aside whenever they have presented themselves in front of Les Jaunards.Toulon are greedy, though.Despite recent history, recent results or the fact that they are a warm smile away from being branded mercenary, the pack from France’s sunny south have proven big game players in their ranks and men who would happily bend rules if it meant they won a prize. It is a chop-licking prospect. Everywhere you look there are impressive match-ups.Still got it: Wilkinson prepares for the final with a flourishNapolioni Nalaga against Rudi Wulf is a head-to-head between two players that yearn to cut loose. Nathan Hines and Jamie Cudmore versus Bakkies Botha and Danie Rossouw is a ruck-time prospect with all the subtlety and grace of a sledgehammer hitting a landmine. Wilkinson against Brock James could be like chess with studs.The most volatile and keenest battle on the Dublin turf this Saturday could well be in the scrum, though. Toulon rely on big ol’ boys while Clermont have enough scars and synergy to see them tramp through. Much depends on who elevates their level of performance, but keep an eye on Davit Zirakashvili butting up against Andrew Sheridan.Most will expect this final written in French to conclude with Clermont joy. What it will come down to is whether Clermont score as they are expected to, or if Toulon can hold on and roll over the line at the last.ASM Clermont Auvergne: Byrne; Sivivatu, Rougerie (c), Fofana, Nalaga; James, Parra; Domingo, Kayser, Zirakashvili, Cudmore, Hines, Bonnaire, Vosloo, ChoulySubs: Paulo, Debaty, Ric, Pierre, Bardy, Radosavljevic, Skrela, King Toulon’s fly-half Jonny Wilkinson (C) runs during a training session on May 14, 2013 at the Mayol Stadium in Toulon, Southern France. Toulon will play the European cup final match against Clermont on May 18, 2013 at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK PENNANT (Photo credit should read FRANCK PENNANT/AFP/Getty Images) last_img read more

World Cup 2015: New Zealand 62-13 France

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Magic trick: Julian Savea scores the second of his three tries. Photo: Getty Images Attendance: 71,619For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. 746 – The number of metres made by New Zealand, nearly twice that of France (388) and including 142 from Julian Savea.23 – The number of tackles missed by France while New Zealand missed 20.New Zealand: B Smith; N Milner-Skudder (B Barrett ht), C Smith (SB Williams 52), M Nonu, J Savea; D Carter, A Smith (T Kerr-Barlow 65); W Crockett (J Moody 28), D Coles (K Mealamu 61), O Franks (C Faumuina 52), B Retallick, S Whitelock, J Kaino (V Vito 65), R McCaw (capt, S Cane 69), K Read.Tries (9): Retallick, Milner-Skudder, Savea 3, Kaino, Read, Kerr-Barlow 2. Cons: Carter 7. Pen: Carter.Solo effort: Louis Picamoles scores France’s only try in the first half. Photo: Getty ImagesFrance: S Spedding; N Nakaitaci, A Dumoulin (M Bastareaud 61), W Fofana, B Dulin; F Michalak (R Tales 12), M Parra (R Kockott 69); E Ben Arous (V Debaty 61), G Guirado (D Szarzewski 57), R Slimani, P Papé (Y Nyanga 48), Y Maestri, T Dusautoir (capt), B le Roux, L Picamoles (D Chouly 72).Try: Picamoles. Con: Parra. Pens: Spedding, Parra.Yellow card: Picamoles (47).Referee: Nigel Owens (Wales)Man of the Match: Julian Savea A review of the New Zealand v France 2015 World Cup quarter-final at the Millennium Stadium New Zealand booked a World Cup semi-final against South Africa with a nine-try demolition of France at the Millennium Stadium. Julian Savea scored a hat-trick as the French had no answers to a lethal All Blacks attack that had power, pace and panache. The gaps in France’s defence did not help their cause as they fell to record, and frankly embarrassing, defeat by New Zealand. Little wonder that Philippe Saint-André’s appearance on the big screen was met with a chorus of boos.WHAT’S HOTSpeed of thought – The All Blacks operate at a higher pace than any other team. They haven’t been as sharp as expected through the pool stages – knock-ons here and poor kicks there – but it all clicked against France. Brodie Retallick scored a try from a chargedown, Ben Smith won a high ball when competing with France’s giant No 8 Louis Picamoles, Ma’a Nonu punched holes throughout and kicked accurately. They make the right decisions at the right time 99% of the time, and execute difficult skills at speed. France couldn’t react quick enough, or with the necessary commitment, in defence to contain them.First act: Brodie Retallick dives over for the opening try. Photo: Getty ImagesOffloads – Dan Carter produced a sublime pass out of the tackle for Julian Savea’s first try while props Joe Moody and Charlie Faumuina also delivered try-scoring offloads. Skills are sharp from one to 15.Julian Savea – The New Zealand wing knocked over three people – Noa Nakaitaci, Scott Spedding and Rabah Slimani – en route to his second try. In the second half, when running out from his own 22, he put Remi Tales on his backside. And he is this tournament’s top try-scorer to date. At full pelt, he is nigh-on unstoppable.WHAT’S NOTHaka response – In 2007 we had the face-off, in 2011 we had the arrowhead and in 2015 we had… nothing. France simply stood on the ten-metre line as New Zealand performed the haka. A shame – we were hoping for a little more drama. It was much the same during the match itself.Fitting stage: The Millennium Stadium all set for New Zealand v France. Photo: Getty ImagesBreakdown discipline – Player safety has been a big focus at this World Cup, as it should be. Referees have clamped down on the neck roll, it’s the same with dangerous tackles – but one area that seems to be glossed over is ruck entry. Too often in this game players flew into rucks, sometimes straight over the top of the players on the floor, and made no effort to keep their feet. This is extremely dangerous and the sooner it’s more regularly penalised, the better.Piri Weepu’s outfit – The 2011 World Cup winner and former All Blacks scrum-half was part of the in-stadium punditry team – and did his best impression of a human disco ball. Black, sparkly tops are common sights on nights out in Cardiff… on women. In the style stakes, his French counterpart Olivier Magne was a clear winner. Though that was the only contest France won all night.Down and out: Pascal Pape and Thierry Dusautoir look dejected at the final whistle. Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICS62 – A record number of points scored by a team in a RWC knockout game. Before this, no team had scored more than 50 points.last_img read more

Wales v New Zealand – Five things we learnt

first_imgWales yet again came up short against the All Blacks as their 64-year wait for a win continued, here we dissect where the game was won and lost TAGS: Highlight The difference: The All Blacks wings plundered four tries against a powerless Welsh defence LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Defence – a rare lapseEven when Wales have lacked the distributing twelve and line breaking fullback, they have always been able to rely on their defence. When analysing their stats, a defensive completion of over 90% is a given. Often the number is over 92% which is an awesome number at test level. But against the All Blacks, Wales completed just 78% of their tackles – just 86 from 110.Running amok: Waisake Naholo proved too much for Wales’ defenceThe Welsh backline missed 14 tackles between them which is a big number when you consider that the All Blacks backline missed just 8 tackles whilst having to make more than double that of Wales. It was a particularly difficult day for Wales’ wings with both Waisake Naholo and Rieko Ioane pouring through and around Wales like single cream. Between them the pair made ten clean breaks, beat eight defenders and scored four tires. The Kiwi wings were a joy to watch for the neutral; Sean Edwards will not have seen it that way.Reiko Ioane – a man amongst boysAt just 20 years of age, it was the boy who was the man amongst boys. Ioane is a rare player, one who is blessed with both technical efficiency and natural talent. Whilst his hands are doing what they have been coached to do, his feet are doing what you can’t be coached to do. On numerous occasions he ghosted around Welsh defenders and moved through gaps that even quantum physics would struggle to explain.The main man: 20-year-old Rieko Ioane put in a stellar performance in a stellar yearHe was top for metres made (117m) clean breaks (5) and defenders beaten (5), on either team, and most importantly scored two tries. Ioane won the 2017 Breakthrough Player of the Year and he should arguably have won the senior award too. It was a pleasure to watch him play. Well done Reiko. Possession not enoughThere was a time in test rugby, roughly from 2009 – 2014, where goal kicking was enough to win you games. Where a game plan could be built around territory, attritional carrying and contestable up and unders – where the subsequent penalties could be converted into enough points to win the game. That is no longer the case and hasn’t been for at least three seasons and Wales are paying the price for being behind the curve. Saturday’s loss to New Zealand was a prime example – Wales had 63% percent of the ball and 67 % percent of the territory yet were outscored five tries to two. Up until the 38th minute Wales had a staggering 70% of the ball and 83% of the territory yet still trailed by six points to 12.Showing the way: Scott Williams’ try proved Wales can play in an adventurous styleThis isn’t to say that Wales were blown away; they weren’t. Wales were competitive for large periods of the game; periods in which Josh Navidi and Rob Evans excelled. But at no stage did Wales look as though they could outscore the All Blacks – and it must be said this was the worst All Blacks performance of the season, by some distance. It isn’t that Wales don’t have the players, they do. You just to need to look at how comfortable Owen Williams looks as a test 12 to realise that Wales could and should have been playing in this style at the beginning of the World Cup cycle, not over half way through. Whilst New Zealand, Australia, Scotland, England and Ireland have been strolling around in skinny denim for a while now, Wales have only just put down the bootcut Levis and look way behind the trend – just look at Scotland strutting their stuff in their skinny, eight try, Vivienne Westwoods.Josh Navidi a legitimate Welsh sevenJosh Navidi has been one of those desperately unfortunate test players who’s found their career blocked by not one player, but two. Were it not for Sam Warburton and Justin Tipuric, Navidi would have been a 40 cap player and his performance against the All Blacks backs that up. It was a consummate example of modern openside play. Wales’ top tackler (16) and third top ball carrier with (45m), this was Navidi doing the business on the floor and on his feet.Making an impression: Josh Navidi grabbed his opportunity with both handsIt was a performance which equalled one the most revered opensides in the game – Sam Cane. Add to that two clean breaks and four defenders beaten and you have a performance that legitimately places Navidi in the Welsh frame for the Rugby World Cup in 2019. Navidi is just 26 years old and is often omitted from the Welsh openside conversation where names such as Ellis Jenkins, Ollie Griffiths and James Davies tend to dominate the conversation. That may now have changed.Rob Evans – the 3rd distributorRob Evans once again delivered a Gethin Jenkins-type of performance – of which there can be no greater praise. Delivering all the basics and excelling at the extras – a forward coaches dream. Evans was once again the teams third most prolific passer of the ball and has carved out a niche as Wales’ third distributor, a position where he regularly manages to pass the ball outside of the defensive ‘hinge’.Baller: Rob Evans is a fine distributor in the looseA distributing forward is a valuable weapon to have. When the ball reaches Rob Evans many defenders simply rush up believing that he is going to run straight and set up a short hit and ruck, only to be duped by a subtle pass to the outside. Evans has been Wales’ standout performer in this year’s Autumn Series and has ended the debate over who will become Wales’ next long term loose-head.last_img read more

A magazine subcription is the perfect Mother’s Day gift

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Treat your Mum this Mother’s Day with a magazine subscription. We have great offers on Rugby World subscriptions and a whole range of other magazine titles. Rugby World offers unrivalled access to the players and coaches behind the thrilling clashes that define the sport of international rugby union. It offers an all-round comprehensive package of rugby action, timely results and fixtures along with images that capture the excitement and passion that define this high-impact sport. We also have a monthly local focus on the British national teams and fascinating in-depth interviews with all the key players.That’s not all, with a Rugby World subscription:You won’t miss a single issue of your favourite magazine: We send it to your home every month – no effort required on your part!As a subscriber you pay less that you would at the newsagent.You get access to the ipad/iphone editions thrown in at no extra cost and you can download your first digital magazine right away.If your Mum isn’t a rugby fan we have plenty other magazine titles in our portfolio including Country Life, Ideal Home and Horse and Hound, just to name a few. Take a look at some fantastic magazine subscription deals here.center_img This Mother’s Day we have 38% off Rugby World subscriptions, giving you the opportunity to join us as a Rugby World subscriber from just £19.49.This Rugby World subscription deal ends midnight Sunday 11th MarchIf your Mum is a rugby fan a Rugby World subscription is the perfect gift, and you get to read it when she’s finished:last_img read more

Rugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: Kakegawa

first_img Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: KakegawaSEEAt the Kakegawa Kachouen Park you can interact with a wide variety of birds – the vast majority are not caged so you can even get involved in feeding them – and take in the sights and smells of the flower displays. It’s perfect if you want a relaxing morning before the rugby kicks off.DOWant to dress up before the match? You can rent a Ninja costume and have your photo taken with Kakegawa Castle as a backdrop – that would definitely be one for the album! And take the time to check out the castle, too, for it has a lot of historical relevance.Cheers! Local beerEATOkay, these are more drinking than eating options! Try Kakegawa craft beer, which is made from local ingredients and can be found in three bars within a five-minute walk from the station – Bucket Here & Corner, Funny Farm and Sakanamachi Food Bar SAL.If you prefer to sup on something non-alcoholic, don’t miss the chance to try Fukamushi Kakegawa Green Tea, which has a great reputation in Japan.TOURIST WEBSITE TOP TIPThere are plans to run a shuttle bus between Kakegawa Station and the stadium, with a journey time of around 15 minutes, so that will make getting to the ground nice and easy. Standing tall: Traditional armour at Kakegawa Castle bt-r.jp/kakegawa/englishWORLD CUP VISITThere’s an awesome foursome of matches being played at Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa – Japan v Ireland on 28 September, South Africa v Italy on 4 October, Scotland v Russia on 9 October and Australia v Georgia on 11 October. So if you’re in town for the rugby, explore Kakegawa.Related: Rugby World Cup venuesAwesome: Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa hosts four games at the tournamentGETTING THEREYou can get the bullet train to Kakegawa City from Tokyo (one hour 45 minutes) and Kyoto (one hour 55 minutes).DID YOU KNOW? Kaiun Sake, which is produced by Kakegawa’s Doi Brewery, was awarded the Ginjo Trophy and three silver medals in the sake section of the 2017 International Wine Challenge. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS From fancy dress to floral displays, this host city has it all TAGS: Japan last_img read more

Archbishop Deng: ‘Without reconciliation there will be no South Sudan’

first_img Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Photo: ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] The primate of the Episcopal Church of Sudan has called on the people of South Sudan to be “united in order to achieve lasting national healing, peace and reconciliation.”The Most Rev. Daniel Deng Bul, who is also bishop of Juba, made the call in a strategic paper developed by his office to help guide the peace process. Deng was appointed chairperson of the national reconciliation committee by the President of South Sudan Salva Kiir in April this year to facilitate in “healing the mental wounds” in the country.“God created and placed you here in South Sudan to live together in peace and harmony,” the archbishop wrote. “We attained this freedom as a united people and it is very important that you remember that it is God who has helped this country gain its freedom.”Deng bemoaned the high levels of violence in the country even though all the tribes participated in the struggle for liberation. He said, “It is distressing to see the very people who struggled shoulder to shoulder now butchering each other as though they have forgotten where God has taken us through.“We have to recognize that we have wounded ourselves through cattle stolen from each other, abducted children and women, land grabbed,” he wrote. “We have killed and wounded one another and destroyed our own property. We have spawned a culture of violence, corruption, nepotism, and inequity. We cannot continue this way. Enough is enough!”Deng acknowledged that South Sudan’s long track records of successive initiatives, combined with deep and fresh emotional wounds from the civil war suggest that the road to national healing, peace and reconciliation will be difficult. However he stated that there are opportunities on which any attempt at reconciliation should be anchored including a robust civil society sector and growing public demand for peace.“It is our faith in God, which brings us together and gives us the strength and courage to heal ourselves,” said the archbishop. “If there is no spiritual foundation, our attempts at reconciliation will be flawed and it will not succeed [but] the people of South Sudan are deeply religious, whether followers of Christianity, Islam or traditional religions.”Deng reminded the people of South Sudan that it is their responsibility to build and bestow a sense of collective responsibility to their children and future generations.He said that while forgiveness is painful it is the ‘bitter pill’ that every South Sudanese needs to swallow. “We have to swallow our pride for the sake of the survival of our young nation. The pride of tribe, of clan, of class, of creed, of political party, and of personal ambition must not obscure the focus on the future of our nation.”“We cannot have fellowship without forgiveness, reconciliation and healing. We need to exercise mercy towards each other. Now is the time to stand together as a nation, as we have done before when the need is great,” advised Deng.The high-level National Reconciliation Committee of the National Program for Healing, Peace and Reconciliation, which has since set up state committees for the peace process in all the 10 states, is at the final stages of setting up a national secretariat, to be headed by a general secretary.The archbishop has however cautioned the public and the media to avoid rushing to label parts of the process as “success” or “failure.” He explained that “reconciliation is a long-term process and it will have its ups and downs. If one part of the process is seen not to be working well lessons will have been learned and it will be redesigned.”“If there is conflict or controversy, it is simply an indication of another area where reconciliation is needed,” said the archbishop. “The success of the process will be judged by the state of the nation in five, 10 or 20 years’ time, not on short-term issues.“Therefore let us be patient as we move along. Let us all join hands to remove every obstacle from the way of the people of the Republic of South Sudan.” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Archbishop Deng: ‘Without reconciliation there will be no South Sudan’ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 1, 2013 at 10:43 pm Amen, Bp. Deng! Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC By Bellah ZuluPosted Jul 1, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Africa, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Sudan & South Sudan Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Marylin Day says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

Se otorgaron becas para Educación de Teología para Episcopales, Anglicanos…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA [22 de octubre de 2013]  La Comisión de Educación Teológica para América Latina y el Caribe (CETALC) ha concedido 26 becas en seis categorías, además de financiamiento administrativo por más de $ 299.443 para apoyar las necesidades de formación y educación teológica de la Iglesia en América Latina y el Caribe.Las subvenciones fueron aprobadas por el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal en su reunión de octubre.CETALC se formó después del cierre de 1976 del Seminario Episcopal del Caribe, situada en Puerto Rico. En aquel entonces, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal estableció el Fondo Fiduciario para la Educación Teológica para América Latina y el Caribe, con los fondos de la venta de los bienes destinados a apoyar los programas de educación teológica de las diócesis que utilizaban el seminario.Las seis categorías de subvenciones CETALC son: programas diocesanos, los programas provinciales y regionales, la educación teológica continua, la investigación y la producción de recursos teológicos, becas de estudios de posgrado, becas Leonardo Romero.Programas Diocesanos• Colombia: $7,500.00• Costa Rica: $10,000.00• Cuba: $10,000.00• Republica Dominicana: $10,000.00• Ecuador Litoral: $9,000.00• El Salvador: $10,000.00• Guatemala: $10,000.00• Haití: $10,000.00• Honduras : $10,000.00• México Cuernavaca: $8,000.00• México DF: $10,000.00• Sudeste de Mexico: $10,000.00• Noreste de México: $10,000.00• Panamá: $10,000.00• Puerto Rico: $10,000.00• Recife, Brazil: $10,000.00• Venezuela: $7,500.00• Islas Virgenes: $9,000.00• Western Mexico: $10,000.00Programas provinciales y regionales• Provincia IX: $28,500.00• IARCA – Centro Anglicano para estudios superiores de Teología (CAETS en español): $28,500.00Programa de educación teológica continua    • El Rdo. Canónigo Jose Francisco Salazar de Venezuela: $4,500.00Investigación y producción de recursos teológicos• Laura Sarraf Fundora, Diócesis of Cuba: $3,897.00Estudios de Postgrado• Izaias Torquato da Silva, Diócesis de Recife, Brasil: $6,667.00Becas Leonardo Romero• The Most Rev. Francisco Manuel Moreno, Northern Mexico: $3,000.00• The Rt. Rev. Julio Murray, Panama: $3,000.00Trabajo administrativo• CETALC: $40,379.37Membresía                     Los siguientes son los miembros CETALC:• La Iglesia Episcopal: Reverendísimo William Gregg, Diócesis de Carolina del Norte;• Rdo. John L. Kater, Diócesis de California y Hong Kong• México: Rda. Alba Sally Sue Hernandez; Sta. Magali Zarco Osnaya• IARCA: Rdo. Eduardo Chinchilla; Reverendísimo Carlos Enrique Lainfiesta• Provincia IX:  Reverendísimo Julio Cesar Holguin, Diócesis de Republica Dominicana;• Rda. Emily Morales, Diócesis de Puerto Rico• Brasil: Reverendísimo Filadelfo Oliveira• Cuba: Rda. Dra. Marienela de la Paz• Haití:    Rdo. Abiade Lozama• Islas Virgenes: Lic. Rosalie Simmonds Ballantine• Ex-Oficio: Sta. Amanda de la Cruz Ybert – Tesorera de CETALC• Personal: Reverendísimo Wilfrido Ramos; Rda. Glenda McQueenPara obtener más información, póngase en contacto con Rda. Glenda McQueen,[email protected] Representante de la Iglesia Episcopal en América Latina y el Caribe. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Se otorgaron becas para Educación de Teología para Episcopales, Anglicanos en el Caribe y Latín América Posted Oct 22, 2013 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Hundreds gather to be ‘Enthusiastically Episcopalian in South Carolina’

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Holly BehrePosted May 6, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing May 7, 2014 at 7:19 pm This is the joyous fulfilment of a long-awaited hope: that the authentic Episcopal identity and witness would be reaffirmed in South Carolina. When we began seven years ago to transform a ” house church” of just a handful of those in Beaufort who wanted to remain the faithful alternative to the secessionist movement into an organized congregation in continuing union with the national church, some felt we could never survive. The enthusiasm of little St. MARK’s in Port Royal never waned. God kept the promise alive. What a thrill that the reorganized Diocese is now a reality….and that St. Mark’s is there to lead the celebration. South Carolina Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Hundreds gather to be ‘Enthusiastically Episcopalian in South Carolina’ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Comments (2) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Robert R. Hansel says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John M Stevenson says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA May 7, 2014 at 7:48 pm Refreshing and uplifting. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, presides at Holy Eucharist at the altar of Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church, Pawley’s Island, South Carolina, with clergy and acolytes from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina. Among the altar party is Bishop Provisional Charles G. vonRosenberg to Jefferts Schori’s right. Photo: Holly Behre/The Episcopal Church in South Carolina[The Episcopal Church in South Carolina] More than 300 people came up a road lined with Episcopal flags to worship, pray, give thanks and plan for the future of their diocese with each other and with help from leaders from across The Episcopal Church at the “Enthusiastically Episcopalian in South Carolina” Conference on May 3 at Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church in Pawley’s Island, South Carolina.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, President of the House of Deputies Gay Clark Jennings and a team from the Diocese of Pittsburgh led by that diocese’s former Provisional Bishop Kenneth Price joined the gathering as keynote speakers and workshop leaders.The all-day educational conference was sponsored by The Episcopal Forum of South Carolina, a not-for-profit organization that supports The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, The Episcopal Church and the worldwide Anglican Communion primarily through educational offerings.It was the presiding bishop’s first visit to South Carolina since January 2013, when she convened a special reorganizing convention after the former bishop of the diocese, Mark Lawrence, announced he was leaving The Episcopal Church. At that convention, local Episcopalians elected the Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg as bishop provisional to lead The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.Jefferts Schori presided at the May 3 event’s opening Eucharist. As the procession began to gather, she visited with the lay ministers, choirs and clergy, seeking out the young acolyte team inside the church to share a few words before the service began. She also paused many times for people who wanted their photograph taken beside her.In his sermon, the Rev. William J. Keith, rector of Holy Cross Faith Memorial, spoke of the many volunteers who came together to organize the day. “You are legion – the good kind of legion!” he said. He spoke of the difference between volunteer recruiting today, where potential helpers are told “everything will be set up for you, all you have to do is show up,” and how Jesus appointed the seventy in Luke 10:1-9 – the Gospel reading for the day – to be sent like lambs in the midst of wolves with no purse, bag or sandals.For The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, “no sandals” might be the equivalent of starting a church with no prayer books or buildings, he said.“Jesus wasn’t asking for volunteers … Jesus is and will always be sending us out, not as volunteer. He appoints us,” Keith said. “But we are not unprepared. We have what we need.”‘The State of the Diocese’VonRosenberg was greeted and thanked with a long standing ovation from the people who were packed into the church. Later, as he delivered his keynote address, he noted that the identity of the diocese is one that embraces a wide variety of conditions, traditions, and theological beliefs. We are both progressive and conservative; we are both sad and feeling liberated, he said.“We are ‘both-and’ people rather than’ either-or’ people. We are Anglican Episcopalians, and we are enthusiastically so,” he said. “We have a wonderful opportunity to build a future. The foundation has been laid. Now, what do we want to build on it?”Rather than build on old models, he said, we must “build whatever the spirit of God leads us to build in our day.”The bishop spoke of ways in which the diocese can reclaim its identity. One way is by recalling its history, he said. At that point he concluded his address by introducing a surprise: Two actors presented a brief scene from an upcoming play based on the martyrdom of previous South Carolina Bishop William Alexander Guerry.In the last year, the diocese has brought renewed attention to the story of Guerry, who was gunned down in his office in Charleston in 1928 after taking a stand for racial justice. Actors Robin Burke and Bradley Keith played the parts of Guerry and the Rev. Albert Thomas in “Truth in Cold Blood,” a play by Tom Tisdale (who is the chancellor of the diocese) that is being performed at the historic Dock Street Theatre June 16-20.VonRosenberg’s full address is here.‘Connecting to the wider church’The presiding bishop spoke of how all connections are grounded in creation.“The care and stewardship of those connections and relationships are the basis of all justice. … Righteousness is about the proper care of those relationships,” she said. The ministry of Jesus “is toward that garden where all live in peace because justice prevails…. That green and growing garden is an image of Jesus’ work in restoring the whole creation.”She reviewed the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals that The Episcopal Church adopted to help guide ito s work talleviate worldwide poverty. While the goals were far from perfect, “they have been an enormous prod to the world and the church to do a better job of loving our neighbors in concrete ways,” she said.The presiding bishop said that the Anglican Communion has developed a broader framework for thinking about mission: the Five Marks of Mission.“God’s mission needs the gifts of the whole body working in constructive collaboration, because none of us can do it all, and none of us can do it in isolation,” she said. “Mission focuses on connecting and supporting the diverse parts of the Body of Christ.”Work centered on the Five Marks of Mission can only happen, she said, through networking, partnering and collaborating in the Anglican community.Jefferts Schori noted that The Episcopal Church has been formally called the “Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society” since the 1830s, and every Episcopalian is a member of it. She urged local churches to discover opportunities for mission by listening to the hungers and yearnings in their congregations: who has a passion for healing, for justice? What gifts are present in the people and relationships?“Where does injustice offend you? That is the Spirit speaking. Draw in companions and resources from beyond your congregation to respond. Even the basic work of building those relationships for missions is a reconciling move,” she said.“You have abundant gifts here, just look at this room. I know there is passion burning within you. Connect those gifts and that passion, and you will discover in your presence the reign of God. Mission is the fire of the church: Burn, my friends! Burn, and let your light shine!”‘Leadership in challenging times’The president of the House of Deputies said she reflected as she prepared her talk that “here in South Carolina, you all already know more than a few things about leadership in challenging times. You are persevering through legal, financial, logistical, spiritual and practical challenges, and your enthusiasm, grace and dignity in the face of it all inspires me and many other deputies and leaders around the church.”“I am grateful for your service and your commitment to our common life. You are the epitome of what it means to be enthusiastically Episcopalian,” she said.She quoted theologian Paul Tillich, in a work titled “On the Boundary,” to talk about the times the church is facing.“In so many ways, all of us who are leading today’s church, whether we are 18 or 80, are standing on a boundary line that marks the end of the old, institutional church and the beginning of what the church of the 21st century is becoming. It is our job to stand on that boundary and help others across. Some of us, like Moses, won’t get there ourselves. Others of us are becoming the leaders who will turn the hope into reality. But all of us are on the boundary together.”Jesus, Jennings said, on his way to Jerusalem was on the border between Samaria and Galilee.“Jesus was often on the border between the old and the new, between death and new life, between the old covenant and the new covenant, between the cultural norms of the time and an expansive understanding of who is worthy and has value,” she said.“Jesus teaches us that leadership is a choice you make rather than a position you occupy.”As a fan of David Letterman, Jennings offered a “Top Ten” list of traits of leaders in challenging times. Number One on her list: “You know, deep in your heart, that the unity we all want so very much is found in our common life grounded and centered in Jesus Christ.”Jennings’ full address is here.‘Lessons learned, lessons shared’Price, who was bishop suffragan of the Diocese of Southern Ohio when he was elected in 2009 as bishop provisional of the Diocese of Pittsburgh to lead that diocese through the aftermath of a time of schism when a majority of members left The Episcopal Church, told the gathering that in previous times, decisions had been made in isolation, and the reorganized diocese made a commitment to total transparency and collaborative decision making.They focused on telling their own stories positively, and refrained from disparaging those who had left the church. As time passed, he said, people began to return.“They had a weariness… they no longer wanted to hear the litany of how bad things were every Sunday,” said Price, who retired from his work in Pittsburgh in 2012. They wanted to hear the Gospel of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.”Over time, 10 churches that initially had left the church have come back; 55 percent of the congregations in the diocese are now part of The Episcopal Church, Price said. The diocese includes a wide spectrum of beliefs, traditions and practices, but shares an abhorrence of a narrow view, he said.“Always remember that you are in the Body of Christ, and in that you find your true identity,” Price said.In addition to Price, the members of the Pittsburgh team who led workshops on “Rebuilding While Rejoicing” and “Showing the Way While Staying the Course” were the Rev. Nancy Chalfant-Walker, rector of St. Stephen’s, Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh; Russ Ayres, member of the Board of Trustees of the Diocese of Pittsburgh; the Rev. Kris McInnes, priest-in-charge of St. David’s, Peter’s Township; and Rich Creehan, diocesan communications director.— Holly Behre is director of communications for the Episcopal Church in South Carolina. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more