AccorHotels inaugurates its second ibis in Chennai

first_imgAccorHotels has opened its second ibis in Chennai. Located on Mount Road in the centre of the city, ibis Chennai City Centre offers 155 rooms, a restaurant, a lounge and bar area, two meeting rooms and free WiFi.“The brand combines the ultimate comfort of modern and well-equipped rooms with the highest level of service for business and leisure travellers. The opening of ibis Chennai City strengthens our brand presence in Chennai and adds to the growing ibis network of 12 hotels in the region,” said Jean-Michel Cassé, Senior Vice President of operations for AccorHotels India.The new hotel becomes AccorHotels’ third property in Chennai, following the ibis Chennai SIPCOT and Novotel Chennai SIPCOT in 2014, which launched as dual-branded property in 2014.last_img read more

Go back to the enewsletter Last night Thursday 2

first_imgGo back to the e-newsletterLast night, Thursday 28 August, LATTE and other selected media attended the Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel Sydney‘s $13.5 million redesign launch-slash-slumber party.Guests sipped on glasses of Moët & Chandon and the hotel’s signature specially distilled Archie Rose “Out of the Blu” gin as Peter Tudehope, the hotel’s General Manager, addressed the guests.The one-year renovation included refreshing all 336 guest rooms, 28 suites and the property’s meeting and events space.The five-star hotel was originally the  John Fairfax & Son building, then the Bank of New South Wales, before being bought by Radisson in 2000.After Tudehope’s speech, guests were surprised with the cosy hotel experience of watching ‘Breakfast at Tiffanys’ in bed while snacking on fairy floss and popcorn, in the hotel’s contemporary events space.Guests in attendance were treated to a goody bag with a pair of Papinelle socks and vouchers for a complimentary tour of the Archie Rose Distilling Co. and the hotel bar to enjoy its signature Archie Rose High Tea.Go back to the e-newsletterlast_img read more

Essential fats in diet may regulate protein secretion in muscles by altering

first_imgMay 15 2018A new study reveals that essential fats in the diet may play a role in regulating protein secretion in the muscles by changing the way genes associated with secretion act. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are plant-based essential fats-;called polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)-;that humans consume through diet. ALA is an omega-3 fatty acid; LA is an omega-6 fatty acid. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have been shown to be beneficial to brain health and reduce the risk of inflammation and heart disease.Previous studies have shown that proteins secreted from the muscles (skeletal muscle secretome) help regulate signaling of metabolic activities such as muscle fiber formation and the function of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. This prior research suggests that obesity and insulin resistance-;an inability of the body to properly respond to insulin-;changes the skeletal muscle secretome. A research team from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, explored how regular consumption of essential fats regulates how genes use information (gene expression) associated with the skeletal muscle secretome.Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellAEBP1 gene may play key role in the development and severity of liver diseaseDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaThe researchers studied glucose levels and took samples from muscle and RNA-;a molecule chain that uses genetic information from DNA to produce proteins in the cells-;from four groups of rats: a lean group ate a normal diet (“lean”), an obese group ate food supplemented with ALA (“ALA”), an obese group ate food supplemented with LA (“LA”), and an obese control group ate a normal diet (“obese control”). After 12 weeks on the respective diets, both the ALA and LA groups had lower glucose levels and better glucose tolerance compared to the obese control group. These factors improved more in the ALA group than the LA one. In addition, the researchers found more than 135 genes that expressed differently-;based on diet-;among the four groups of animals, including genes that correspond with 15 secreted proteins. Expression in most of these proteins differed between the lean and obese groups.These results suggest that “LA and ALA may differentially regulate the skeletal muscle secretome,” the researchers explained, and that the addition of PUFA further alters gene expression. “Our findings concerning the relationship between obesity and the skeletal muscle secretome add valuable information to a relatively understudied area of investigation.”Source: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/2018/25.htmllast_img read more