Soldotna Council To Consider Approval Of Airport Master Plan Phase III

first_imgThe proposed Master Plan was chosen to be implemented in three phases spaced from 2017 to 2035, totaling $46,975,000. The Phase 3 draft states: “The estimated net project costs to the City for the three-phase program are $10,882,813 million after recognition of the receipt of FAA Airport Improvement Program grants.” The purchase of the 40 acres of private property along with 9 acres of Salamatof Native Association property would also allow for the realignment of Funny River Road to the east of the airport. Realignments to Funny River Road would also require closure of sections of Kenai River Avenue and Norma Avenue. The Soldotna City Council is scheduled to consider approval of the Airport Master Plan’s Phase 3 on Wednesday, January 24, during their regular meeting beginning at 6:00 p.m., in Soldotna City Hall. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-airport-plan.mp3VmJennifer-on-airport-plan.mp300:00RPd The Phase 3 draft is up for council consideration, and has a number of big changes planned for the airport. Among the top changes, the acquisition of 49 acres by the City to further develop the airport is recommended, which would pave the way for the current 5,000-foot runway to be extended by 1,000 feet.center_img Public Works Director and Airport Manager Kyle Kornelis said the Phase 3 draft was updated just before the Airport Commission voted to finalize it on December 21, 2017. Figure 9.1 in the Phase 3 draft which color codes the anticipated schedule. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Soldotna City Council will mull over approval of their airport’s Master Plan Update Phase III this week, a draft which includes the ultimate extension of the runway, land acquisition for expansion, and possibly a public terminal. The Phase 3 draft also suggests that a public terminal building of up to 4,000 square feet might be beneficial for the city. This space could accommodate passenger and cargo facilities not based locally, along with administration offices, pilots’ lounge, food and drink services, and tourist connection services to hotels/motels and rental cars. The draft says, “The existing air taxi operators have expressed a strong interest in continuing their currentmethod of operation from their own facilities,” but the city will monitor the need for a public terminal.last_img read more

Ford Explorer farewell to a friend and more Roadshows week in review

first_imgHonda Mean Mower: Terror distilledReviews editor Manuel Carrillo III had never been scared by any machine with wheels until he met the Mean Mower. A 150-mile-per-hour menace that may offer supercar acceleration, but is nothing like a supercar to drive. Ever wonder what a barrel ride down Niagara Falls is like? Getting the Mean Mower to triple-digit speeds is the internal-combustion equivalent.Click here to read our Honda Mean Mower first drive review. SUNDAY SUNDAY SUNDAY: Monster Jam behind the scenesMonster Jam, the monster truck and off-road-vehicle exhibition gets more entertaining and exciting with each passing year. As it turns out, technology plays a key role in that evolution. Join Roadshow’s resident off-road master, Emme Hall as she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the Monster Jam of the 21st century. Enlarge ImageA midsize crossover SUV with 400 horsepower? Sign us up. Emme Hall/Roadshow Welcome to Roadshow’s week in review, where we take a look back at the biggest stories from the past seven days. The week began with reviews of not one, but two new Ford Explorers, crammed loads of fun into a few minutes with the 150-mile-per-hour Honda Mean Mower, but ended on a somber note with a tribute to a beloved, fallen colleague.Here’s a look at our most important stories from June 16-22, 2019.Top reviews When you should buy a new car instead of repairing yours Now playing: Watch this: Polestar 1 first driveRoadshow’s Editor-in-Chief, Tim Stevens, takes a spin through soaked Sweden in the new, 600-horsepower Polestar 1. For a car that weighs more than 5,100 pounds, Tim says the Polestar is surprisingly light on its feet. 69 Photos Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2020 Ford ExplorerThe Ford Explorer enters its sixth generation for the 2020 model year on new, rear-wheel-drive architecture. Reviews editor Emme Hall has been a busy bee reviewing both the new hybrid variant and the 400-horsepower ST version, which you can check out here. If last year’s Explorer wasn’t already broadly appealing enough, this new one should speak to the masses perhaps like never before.Click here to read our 2020 Ford Explorer Hybrid first drive review. 52 Photos Honda Mean Mower is 200 horsepower of bladed terror 14:04 2019 Honda RidgelineMost pickup truck buyers use their rigs not for working, but for commuting. While adept in both those elements, the 2019 Honda Ridgeline is arguably the best in its segment for the daily slog. As a result, reviews editor Manuel Carrillo III is scratching his head as to why more people aren’t buying this incredible, commuter-carpool-friendly pickup.Click here to read our 2019 Honda Ridgeline in-depth review. 28 Photos Cooley on buying a new car versus fixing your old oneAs cars age, they become more expensive to maintain, eventually to the point where they’ll command more money than a new-car payment. If you’re around that point with your old vehicle, don’t be so fast to buy that shiny new set of wheels. Let Cooley break things down for you first. 9:46 2019 Honda Ridgeline: The commuter’s pickup truck 2020 Ford Explorer Hybrid: Beautiful in blue 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value SUNDAY SUNDAY SUNDAY: We go behind the scenes at Monster… Post a comment Share your voice 38 Photos 0 5:37 Now playing: Watch this: The best hybrid cars and SUVs available in America Top news2020 BMW 8 Series Gran Coupe revealed: We’re quite smitten with the 2019 BMW 8 Series Coupe and Convertible, but for the upcoming 2020 model year, BMW is introducing a more practical Gran Coupe version that has our interest further piqued.Tesla Model 3 Pickup: Can you believe a Tesla Model 3-based pickup is already here? Well, not for you to buy, but one for you to enjoy watching online. YouTuber Simone Giertz is the mastermind behind this build, and we shall now worship at her altar.Bentley goes electric: The flying B will soon be getting a heap of electricity under its wings. By 2023, all of the British brand’s lineup will offer hybrid variants.2020 Kia Seltos debuts: The Kia Seltos is a new, tiny crossover that may be small in footprint, but big on style.Order Domino’s through your Chevy’s infotainment screen: We welcome a simpler way to order pizza, even if that does mean spending more time at the gym.Remembering Davey G. Johnson: Our hearts are heavy this week as we reflect on the life of our dear friend and esteemed colleague, Davey G. Johnson. Rest in peace, you infinitely curious and eternal adventurer. More From Roadshow Top videos 2020 BMW 8 Series Gran Coupe stretches out Tags Polestar 1: World’s first drive in Sweden 29 Photos Roadshowlast_img read more

Dells SecureWorks valued at 142 billion in years first tech IPO

first_imgDell Inc’s cyber security unit, SecureWorks Corp, could be valued at up to $1.42 billion in its initial public offering, the first major U.S. listing of a technology company this year.Atlanta, Georgia-based SecureWorks said on Monday its offering was expected to be priced at $15.50-$17.50 per Class A share, raising as much as $157.5 million.The share issue market worldwide plunged to a seven-year low in the first quarter, more than halving from a year earlier to $106.6 billion, as worries over slowing economic growth kept investors wary, according to Thomson Reuters data.”From such a low base, there’s only one way to go and that’s up,” Jay Ritter, an IPO expert and a professor of finance at the University of Florida, told Reuters.”I don’t expect that there’s going to be a flood of IPOs, but there will be an increasing number of companies in a variety of industries that will go public.”In the past few years, several cyber security firms such as FireEye Inc, Rapid7 Inc and Mimecast Ltd have gone public to take advantage of growing investor interest in them after a spate of hacking attacks on companies including major banks and retailers.However, shares of Rapid7 and FireEye, which popped 70-80 percent in their debut, are now trading way below their IPO prices. Mimecast, which jumped 20 percent on its listing day, has also slipped below its offering price.Ritter warned against premium pricing for stocks of cyber security firms, saying that these companies were fighting for market share, which would keep their profit growth muted.The Wall Street Journal first reported in October that Dell, the third-largest personal computer maker, had filed confidentially for listing SecureWorks, which it bought for $612 million in 2011.Founded in 1999, SecureWorks has 4,200 clients in 59 countries. The company said it planned to list its Class A common stock on the Nasdaq under the symbol “SCWX.”Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs & Co and JP Morgan are among the underwriters for SecureWorks’ IPO.last_img read more

Chinese fund to invest Rs 2000 crore in Indias highway construction

first_imgMoving away from the usual norm of foreign funds buying completed infrastructure projects in India, a Chinese equity hedge fund is expected to invest in an Indian firm for the construction of highways, reported the Hindustan Times. Hong Kong-based Silver Spring Capital will soon invest Rs. 2,000 crore ($300 million) in Hyderabad-based infrastructure developer Transstroy India Limited.”This transaction is a clear evidence of investors’ enthusiasm in long-term infrastructure projects,” a senior government official said.Foreign direct investment in roads and highway sector is crucial to build projects of international standards. Nitin Gadkari, Union minister for road transport and highways, too has been keen on such investment since coming to power.However, FDI inflows have been afflux into the infrastructure support services with 100 percent FDI allowance under automatic route. Construction and maintenance of highway bridges, toll roads, vehicular tunnels and cargo handling, including collection of toll, have witnessed reasonable investments.In 2015, BIF India Holdings, part of Canada-based Brookfield Asset Management, acquired six road and three power projects for Rs. 563 crore from Gammon Infrastructure. In another ongoing acquisition talks, Singapore wealth fund GIC is expected to buy 11 road projects from Reliance Infrastructure.From April 2000 to December 2015, India received FDI to the tune of Rs. 1.14 lakh crore (around $24 billion) in the construction sector that includes roads and highways. The Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) said the inflows amounted to 8.7% of the total FDI inflows in the period.Sources told HT that the Silver Spring Capital “proposal is currently subject to government approval and is likely to be cleared soon.”Transstroy, at present is constructing two highway projects. One, a 54-km stretch from Coimbatore to Mettupalayam in Tamil Nadu, and the second, a 121-km highway from Obedullaganj to Betul in Madhya Pradesh.last_img read more

Salman Khan finally reveals why he didnt marry and probably will not

first_imgSalman Khan InstagramSalman Khan is one such actor who is often asked about his marriage plans, but he hardly entertained such questions with a straight answer. However, the superstar now revealed why he still did not get married, and probably will not ever.Salman, who has been busy promoting his film Bharat, recently opened up about marriage. The actor said that he does not believe in the institution of marriage, but in companionship.”I don’t believe in marriage. I think it’s a dying institution. I don’t believe in it. Companionship? Yes,” he told Bombay Times when asked about the speculations around his marriage.However, when asked if he would like to become a father, Salman replied saying “when it has to happen, it will happen”. Well, Salman’s fans can now be sure that their favourite actor is not going to tie the knot ever.On the work front, Salman’s big movie Bharat is going to be released on June 5. Directed by Ali Abbas Zafar, the film features two actresses – Katrina Kaif and Disha Patani.Based on the 2014 South Korean drama Ode To My Father, Bharat will present Salman in multiple avatars, showcasing his childhood to old age. The trailer of the film received positive response, and it is expected to have a bumper opening at the box office.last_img read more

Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing

first_img © 2015 Phys.org More information: Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny, Published 22 April 2015. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0069 AbstractConversational turn-taking is an integral part of language development, as it reflects a confluence of social factors that mitigate communication. Humans coordinate the timing of speech based on the behaviour of another speaker, a behaviour that is learned during infancy. While adults in several primate species engage in vocal turn-taking, the degree to which similar learning processes underlie its development in these non-human species or are unique to language is not clear. We recorded the natural vocal interactions of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) occurring with both their sibling twins and parents over the first year of life and observed at least two parallels with language development. First, marmoset turn-taking is a learned vocal behaviour. Second, marmoset parents potentially played a direct role in guiding the development of turn-taking by providing feedback to their offspring when errors occurred during vocal interactions similarly to what has been observed in humans. Though species-differences are also evident, these findings suggest that similar learning mechanisms may be implemented in the ontogeny of vocal turn-taking across our Order, a finding that has important implications for our understanding of language evolution. Explore further Citation: Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing (2015, April 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-marmosets-vocalizing.html In the primate world, only humans are able to listen to a sound made by someone else and mimic it, a skill that has led to communication and the different languages spoken around the world. Scientists know that part of communicating involves one person listening to what another says, before responding. This requires an ability to understand what it means to take turns when vocalizing. In this new study, the researchers have found that a young marmoset (a small silvery coated South American monkey) was also able to learn to take turns as part of vocalizing.In their study, the researchers studied the vocalizations of a pair of captive marmoset twins (and their parents) over the first year of their life and report that they observed two parallels to language development. The first was that taking turns when vocalizing was a learned behavior. The second was that the young marmosets were essentially taught to take turns vocalizing by their parents in ways that are similar to the methods human parents use to teach children to wait for another person to finish speaking before they try to speak themselves.In watching the monkeys as they grew, the researchers noted that if a youngster made a vocalization while a parent was vocalizing, that vocalization was typically ignored by the adult, which resulted over time in the youngster learning to wait for the adult to finish before vocalizing. They noted that as time passed, the young monkeys became less likely to interrupt—though it was more pronounced with their mother than with their father.The researchers suggest their findings indicate a learning mechanism that is similar across all primates which could lead to a better understanding of the development of language in humans. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of California has found that marmosets learn to wait for others to stop making noise before they vocalize, at a very young age. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Cecilia Chow, Jude Mitchell and Cory Miller describe a study they undertook with young marmoset twins and their parents and what they learned by doing so.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society Common marmoset. (Callithrix jacchus) Credit: Carmem A. Busko/Wikipedia/CC BY 2.5 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Marmoset monkeys know polite conversationlast_img read more

50 MustHave Features for SmallBusiness Websites Infographic

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Websites are a necessity for businesses of all sizes today — though, surprisingly almost half of small businesses don’t have websites. Still, there are so many design options to choose from and so many websites that it can be tough to know how to stand out.Beyond layout and color scheme, there are a lot of features that are paramount to successful small-business websites. Some are obvious — such as an easy-to-remember domain name, a logo and contact information — and others are more subtle, like an online chat button or specific pattern for the content on the site’s inner pages. Thankfully, website design and marketing firm 99MediaLab offers pointers for an effective page from top to bottom, inside and out.Related: The 10 Best Cities to Be a Minority Small-Business Owner (Infographic)Check out the infographic below to learn the best features to have, as well as SEO tips and the technical aspects to consider. See if your site measures up.Click to Enlarge+ Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 1 min read April 2, 2016 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg Are Arguing About AI But Theyre Both

first_img 5 min read In Silicon Valley this week, a debate about the potential dangers (or lack thereof) when it comes to artificial intelligence has flared up between two tech billionaires.Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg thinks that AI is going to “make our lives better in the future,” while SpaceX CEO Elon Musk believes that AI a “fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization.”Who’s right?Related: Elon Musk Says Mark Zuckerberg’s Understanding of AI Is ‘Limited’ After the Facebook CEO Called His Warnings ‘Irresponsible’They’re both right, but they’re also both missing the point. The dangerous aspect of AI will always come from people and their use of it, not from the technology itself. Similar to advances in nuclear fusion, almost any kind of technological developments can be weaponized and used to cause damage if in the wrong hands. The regulation of machine intelligence advancements will play a central role in whether Musk’s doomsday prediction becomes a reality.It would be wrong to say that Musk is hesitant to embrace the technology since all of this companies are direct beneficiaries of the advances in machine learning. Take Tesla for example, where self-driving capability is one of the biggest value adds for its cars. Musk himself even believes that one day it will be safer to populate roads with AI drivers rather than human ones, though publicly he hopes that society will not ban human drivers in the future in an effort to save us from human error.What Musk is really pushing for here by being wary of AI technology is a more advanced hypothetical framework that we as a society should use to have more awareness regarding the threats that AI brings. Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), the kind that will make decisions on its own without any interference or guidance from humans, is still very far away from how things work today. The AGI that we see in the movies where robots take over the planet and destroy humanity is very different from the narrow AI that we use and iterate on within the industry now. In Zuckerberg’s view, the doomsday conversation that Musk has sparked is a very exaggerated way of projecting how the future of our technology advancements would look like.Related: The Future of Productivity: AI and Machine LearningWhile there is not much discussion in our government about apocalypse scenarios, there is definitely a conversation happening about preventing the potentially harmful impacts on society from artificial intelligence. White House recently released a couple of reports on the future of artificial intelligence and on the economic effects it causes. The focus of these reports is on the future of work, job markets and research on increasing inequality that machine intelligence may bring.There is also an attempt to tackle a very important issue of “explainability” when it comes to understanding actions that machine intelligence does and decisions it presents to us. For example, DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), an agency within the U.S. Department of Defense, is funneling billions of dollars into projects that would pilot vehicles and aircraft, identify targets and even eliminate them on autopilot. If you thought the use of drone warfare was controversial, AI warfare will be even more so. That’s why here it’s even more important, maybe even more than in any other field, to be mindful of the results AI presents.Explainable AI (XAI), the initiative funded by DARPA, aims to create a suite of machine learning techniques that produce more explainable results to human operators and still maintain a high level of learning performance. The other goal of XAI is to enable human users to understand, appropriately trust and effectively manage the emerging generation of artificially intelligent partners.Related: Would You Fly on an AI-Backed Plane Without a Pilot?The XAI initiative can also help the government tackle the problem of ethics with more transparency. Sometimes developers of software have conscious or unconscious biases that eventually are built into an algorithm — the way Nikon camera became internet famous for detecting “someone blinking” when pointed at the face of an Asian person or HP computers were proclaimed racist for not detecting black faces on the camera. Even developers with the best intentions can inadvertently produce systems with biased results, which is why, as the White House report states, “AI needs good data. If the data is incomplete or biased, AI can exacerbate problems of bias.”Even with the positive use cases, the data bias can cause a lot of serious harm to society. Take China’s recent initiative to use machine intelligence to predict and prevent crime. Of course, it makes sense to deploy complex algorithms that can spot a terrorist and prevent crime, but a lot of bad scenarios can happen if there is an existing bias in the training data for those algorithms.It important to note that most of these risks already exist in our lives in some form or another, like when patients are misdiagnosed with cancer and not treated accordingly by doctors or when police officers make intuitive decisions under chaotic conditions. The scale and lack of explainability of machine intelligence will magnify our exposure to these risks and raise a lot of uncomfortable ethical questions like, who is responsible for a wrong prescription by an automated diagnosing AI? A doctor? A developer? Training data provider? This is why complex regulation will be needed to help navigate these issues and provide a framework for resolving the uncomfortable scenarios that AI will inevitably bring into society. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. July 28, 2017 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more